Much like other social networks, Twitter regularly works to improve discovery and overall user experience. Because of that, the company is constantly evolving its product. But while some changes are visible, others take place behind the scenes. Today it appears that Twitter is testing a feature that some of you can see: related tweets.

The related tweets feature is displayed below the tweet box when you visit the URL of a tweet on Twitter.com. As the name implies, it highlights tweets that share common words or links as the original tweet. Those displayed can include tweets from people who the individual is following as well as tweets from others.

As The Next Web noted, this feature doesn’t appear to be turned on for everyone, indicating that it’s one of the many experiments Twitter is currently conducting. Additionally, it doesn’t seem to be present on any of the company’s other apps. Without confirmation from Twitter, it’s unknown whether related tweets will be rolled out to a wider test group let alone its entire user base.

Surfacing related content can certainly work in your favor. Pinterest, for example, implements this functionality quite well by displaying related pins after someone has added a new pin to his or her board. Not only does this help create awareness for additional pinners and content, but it helps to keep visitors on the site longer, which could come in handy if the company ever decided to pursue advertising.

On Twitter, related tweets could help extend visitors’ on-site time, but it could also lead to increased engagement, new followers, and active discussions. On the flip side, there’s no telling how related tweets are selected, so questionable or spammy content could find its way into the mix.

Related tweets are just one of the many experiments Twitter launched this year. The feature joins personalized recommendations, related headlines, and threaded conversations. We’ll keep you posted if Twitter shares any additional information regarding how related tweets work, as well as their expected rollout.

[Via: The Next Web, Image credit: Clever Cupcakes]