It’s Twitter Tip Tuesday — every Tuesday we’ll focus on one Twitter Tip and show you how to integrate it into your social media strategy. This week we’ll show you how to create an event and promote it on Twitter, using a free tool called Tweetvite.

Many people are familiar with Facebook Events and how you can use that application to promote your event through that social media channel. But if the majority of your network is on Twitter, or if you’re simply more comfortable with this social media network, then Tweetvite provides a powerful and intuitive way for you to integrate and promote your event with Twitter.

Naming Your Event

Name Your Tweetvite Event
To create your event, navigate to In the top right corner of the home page, click the “Login” link, then click the Twitter button to log in with your Twitter account.

Next, click the dark blue button entitled “Create A Tweetup.” Although this application is ideally designed to create invitations for tweetups, this is really just a semantic distinction. You can use Tweetvite to create and promote any event, whether it’s an in-person gathering (i.e.: a tweetup) or simply a community or commercial event that you’d like to promote through Twitter.

The first field at the top of the page asks for a name for your Tweetup. It’s a good idea to give your event a catchy — and short — name. At the bottom of the page you’ll be given the option to create a hashtag for your event, so it’s not a bad idea to make the name of the event, and its hashtag, the same. For example, if your event is for a Christmas craft fair, you might name the event “ChrisCrafts” and give it a hashtag of #ChrisCrafts. That way, if people are searching for tweets about your event on Twitter, they’ll find it whether they search on the event name (ChrisCrafts) or the hashtag (#ChrisCrafts).

Fill in the Details

Fill Out The Details

If you’ve already logged in to Twitter (recommended), you’ll see your Twitter account name in the field entitled “Hosted By.” That’s a good thing, because when people open the Tweetvite invitation on Twitter, they’ll know where to direct any questions they may have about the event.

Just below the Hosted By field, you’ll see a fully customizable “Description” field where you can enter all the details of your event. Because the invitation you post to Twitter will always be 140 characters or less, use the long Description field to really sell your event to potential attendees.

Let them know exactly what they can expect, along with any incentives you might have to get them to come out (prizes and giveaways usually help draw a crowd). Even though there are separate fields for the date, time, and location of your event (“Start Date,” “Start Time,” “Location Name,” and “Location Address”), it’s a good idea to restate this information right in the Description field as an added reminder to the attendees.

Once you’ve filled out all of the above information, at the bottom of the page, you’ll be given an option to customize the URL link to your invitation in the “Public URL” field. Although the link will be prefaced by the Tweetvite short link “http ://”, you can add your own customized suffix to this link.

Continuing with the craft fair example, you would type ChrisCraft in the Public URL field and the resulting URL you would post to Twitter (and other social networks too) would be “” This customized URL reiterates the branding of your event. It’s also easy for you and your attendees to remember and share with your followers on Twitter. Finally, click the “Save Tweetup Details” link at the bottom of the page to save your changes and publish your Tweetvite invitation.

Promote Your Event

Promote Your Event

Now that your event is live, promote it on Twitter by tweeting a brief description, along with the hashtag and custom URL to the event. Attendees can RSVP on the right hand side of the page, which lets everyone else know who they are and whether or not they plan to attend your event. This can be a great way to visually confirm the popularity of your event as more and more people sign up using their Twitter (or Facebook) accounts.

An added benefit of using Tweetvite to create and promote your event is that every time someone leaves a comment on the invitation page, it automatically posts a truncated version of that comment to his or her Twitter account with a link back the invitation. Encourage interaction in the comments with your attendees and you can spread your invitation far and wide — and fill your event!

Have you ever used Tweetvite to create and promote an event? If you need some inspiration, here’s an example of a Tweetvite done right (courtesy of @Pure_Chiro).